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 OCD surgery-Hock OCD 1yr old shire filly - advice please View next topic
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 9:20 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Hi

I have a 13 month old shire filly (who is an absolute gem) Smile She has OCD in her hock confirmed by x rays and shows a small bone chip which is now loose in the joint and causes swelling although she is sound.

I've been reccomended that she has surgery by 3 different vets and I am hoping this will be done soon.

I'm hoping somebody may have experiences of this & sucess stories about the operation/advice on what happened/experiences etc as I Want to give her the best possible chance of being a sound & happy horse.

Thank you
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RutlandH2O
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 10:01 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I have a rising 5 year old Shire gelding who had OCD of the hock when he was 13 months old, as well. He was never lame, but the swelling was very disfiguring. He had the surgery and has never looked back. Post surgery, he was on box rest in our very large pole barn for 3 months. His feed was strictly monitored and weighed, based on a percentage of his body weight. In fact, he was fed hay exclusively, and a vitamin E supplement. He's a very big boy, 18h1", with huge bone and joints, and was a big baby (my breeding). He was gelded after he completed his confinement. If you have a surgeon with excellent references, go for it.

Just to allay any fears you might have, OCD is very prevalent in warmbloods, especially in the dressage fraternity. The surgery is a commonplace, giving afflicted horses the soundness needed to become proficient at performing dressage, among other disciplines. As a matter of fact, OCD is not uncommon in the Shire horse (have you ever heard the expression "he's blown his hocks?"). The difference between the warmblood and the Shire is that most Shire owners will not go for the surgery, be it the expense or the belief that the horse is no longer of any value.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2014 10:58 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you that's so useful! I am carefully monitoring her diet so she is healthy but on the lean side with good quality hay & nutritious feed. Im looking into the best joint supplement so will look at vit E too that's interesting.

im glad your boy came through it successfully I am so hopeful that it will do the same for us.

Thank you for your reply.
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RutlandH2O
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 12:41 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Do be very careful in the amount of hard feed you give your filly. If you have quality hay (I'm not mentioning grass turnout right now because of the dreadful ground conditions), you really don't need to provide her with much in the way of concentrates. A small amount of feed balancer or vitamin supplement and ad lib hay is all she really needs (the operative word being small).

Good luck with your girl and do let us know how everything turns out.

I forgot to mention...about two weeks, post surgery, my boy was given a joint injection of hyaluronic acid, to aid in joint movement. I did supply an oral joint supplement, as well.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 3:32 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you yes she is only on a very small ration of stud balancer & ill put her on a joint supplement after the op. Im with you on the grass/mud situation. Bring on summer so my girl can get some proper turnout! She is booked in for Thursday so ill keep you posted!
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 10:45 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

surgery was good and my filly is recovering well (such a brave girl) vet removed a number of loose "gravel" sized pieces from the hock and she is alert and well although a bit sleepy when I saw her today.

The surgeon said she has very narrow hocks and brushes them when she walks "which she does" does anybody have experience of this? I know shires can be "cow hocked" but any advice on improving conformation would be great. I don't mind if she is a bit wonky as long as I can hack etc & she is comfortable & happy.

Just pleased she is ok, having some fizz to celebrate Smile

Thanks

Jo
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Tracey
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 14, 2014 4:40 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I glad she is doing well Jo Very Happy

Give her a big hug from me. Very Happy

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RutlandH2O
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 12:39 am Reply with quoteBack to top

So good to know your filly has come through the surgery and is doing well.

Your comment about the filly's hocks is interesting because there is an old saying in Shire circles that "the hocks should be so close that if the horse dungs on one hock, he should knock it off with the other." The same is true for the Clydesdale. It's something I've never quite understood, seeing as other heavies, such as Percherons, Belgians, and Suffolks, do not have such close hind ends. When I first saw the mare that would be my first Shire, I thought she was cow hocked. It was explained to me that since her hind hooves faced forward she was not cow hocked, but close in the rear. I come from years of breeding and successfully showing Golden Retrievers when I lived in the US. Most of the terminology used in describing dog conformation comes from the horse world. If you stand behind a dog and view the hind end moving at a trot, the position of the stifles in relation to the hocks, down to the feet, should form a V. If a dog moves close, that shape will form a Y. If the feet turn out from the hocks to the toes, the shape will be an X, in other words, cow hocked. In Shires and Clydes, their rear conformation forms a Y. Why? Did some influential breeder, in bygone years, have a particular stallion with a close rear, that was walked to a great number of farms covering a substantial number of mares that produced numerous horses with close rears? Old horsemen have explained that the close hind end is there to facilitate the horse walking through the rows when ploughing fields. If that is the case, why have the other heavies, mentioned above, been successful as plough horses without having close rears? Something to ponder.

Your filly is so young. You will see no end of changes in her conformation as she matures. Whenever my vets tended to my newborn foals, they all commented on their close rears, remarks that were kindly critical because their experience has been in every other breed of equine except Shires and Clydes.

Best of luck with your girl. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would love to see a photo of her.
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 15, 2014 6:43 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Thank you for that, it's reassuring to know its quite normal and like you say she is so young she still has lots of developing and changing to do I'm learning new things all the time and just want her to have a happy and leisurely life with me hacking and having fun on stubble fields:)

I'll try and upload a picture[/img]
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Holdfast
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:46 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

I'm so pleased to hear she has come through the operation well.

Regarding close hocks, I think the breeders and showers think that as the horse begins to pull a load, the hocks move outwards with the pressure, so if the hocks are close to start with, there is more room to move outwards .
When they go to shows, some put shoes on which are built up on the outside, to push the hocks together. I shouldn't think that does the horse much good, and how can the judge see if the horse is moving correctly with this practice?
It reminds me of some breeds of dog, where the breeders go to bad extremes, just for fashion.
However, there we are.
I hope she goes on ok, hope to see your pics.
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RutlandH2O
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:26 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Holdfast, you are referring to couping, where the rear shoes are higher on the outside of the hoof, which causes the hind legs to tilt inward, making the legs closer together artificially. Those shoes can cause permanent disfigurement and are forbidden. Judges of Shires and Clydes, in which couping has been employed, can and should excuse those horses from the ring. For many years, couping was the dirty little secret of the farriery world, its use of benefit to the breeders looking for rosettes (close rears are highly prized in the Clyde and Shire worlds) and of no benefit to the horse in any way, shape or form.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:17 am Reply with quoteBack to top

"couping" Sounds horrid! Thanks for the information about the hocks though. Its strange sometimes she stands beautifully but most of the time she stands like a ballerina and actually crosses her back legs completely when she is tied up or stood eating in her stable. She looks very comfortable but I've never seen it before? If i could figure out how to upload a picture i would so you could see what i mean. Im not worried about it as she is a gangly baby but it is interesting. Anyway lots of TLC and recuperation for my girl now she us home & this time next year we will start training to ride Smile) cant wait to get on board this special girl u think we will have lots of fun!
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2014 10:19 am Reply with quoteBack to top

Could anybody tell me how to add a picture to this forum? Thank you
[/img]
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Tracey
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2014 2:06 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

You will need a photbucket account where you upload your photos too.
Its the URL that you can copy to this site. Hope this helps but it has been a while since I downloaded a photo Very Happy

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kay
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 12:18 pm Reply with quoteBack to top

Glad things sorted, can't wait for the pic. It's awful when the young ones are going through these sorts of things.
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